Cracking the Code to Higher Rankings: Unveiling the Secrets of Your Website's Natural Tier!

In this blog post, we'll explore what website volume tiers are and how you can use it to rank higher on Google

Cracking the Code to Higher Rankings: Unveiling the Secrets of Your Website's Natural Tier!
Cracking the Code to Higher Rankings

Are you interested in learning more about how website volume tiers and their effect on Google search results? If so, you're in the right place! In this blog post, we'll explore what website volume tiers are and how you can use it to rank higher on Google. We'll also discuss how to determine your website's tier and maximize your chances of ranking highly in search engine results. So stick around, and let's dive in!

What's your website's natural tier?

The website's natural tier is a measure of how strong is your site in terms of authority to the eyes of Google.

Based on my experiments and other SEOs such as Kyle Roof, a website's monthly visit volume determines a Tier, which points to the keywords the website will have a fair chance at ranking.

Generally speaking, if a keyword's monthly search volume is above your tier, you won't be able to rank high for it even if you do a perfect job on SEO. Of course, things like the number of backlinks to a post may change this, but your new posts will have 0 backlinks anyways.

In this regard, your website's natural tier is akin to an authority measurement. Think of it as your net authority without taking backlinks into account.

How do you determine your website's natural tier?

You can determine your website's natural tier by the traffic your site gets. Here's how you do it:

  1. First of all, select a timeframe. For example, 3 months.
  2. Within that timeframe, find the day you received the lowest amount of clicks in Google Search and take note of the number of clicks received. Let's call this your "Low Clicks".
  3. Also, within the timeframe, find the day you received the highest amount of clicks in Google Search and take note of the number of clicks received. Let's call this your "High Clicks".
  4. Average both numbers to get your "Daily Average Search Volume" from Google.
  5. Multiply that number by 30 to get your Website's Monthly Search Volume (WMSV)
  6. Based on the above, you can go after keywords with a Monthly Search Volume in the range of your WMSV (+10% usually).

What does this all mean? Let's look into it with a few examples.

Example 1

If your website is brand new and gets 1-2 visits per week, your WMSV is about 10. This means you can go after keywords with 0-10 monthly searches.

Example 2

Let's say your website had a low day of 30 clicks in google searches and a high day of 100 clicks in a 3 months timeframe. In this case, you WMSV is 65 x 30 = 1950, so you can go after keywords that have a rough Monthly Search Volume of 2000 and rank on page 1 with relatively low SEO effort and no backlinks.

How do you find a keyword's monthly search volume?

The only way to know how many monthly searches a certain keyword has is by being inside Google's systems. Taking that option aside, you need to rely on other tools that calculate approximate numbers to ballpark the volume.

If you're going with free tools, you may consider using Keyword Surfer (https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/keyword-surfer/bafijghppfhdpldihckdcadbcobikaca). This Chrome Extension integrates with your browser and shows insights when you perform a google search.

One of them is the estimated monthly searches from a given country, as shown in the image below:

seo agency

Switching to paid options, Ahrefs, SEMRush, and the like will usually give you their estimated monthly search volume inside their respective keyword research tool. You can see the following screenshot from ahrefs for reference:

seo agency image 2

As you can see, the numbers vary greatly between the two tools so consider either of them as a guide more than an exact number.

How do you improve your website's natural tier?

To improve your website's natural tier, you need to get more people visiting your website from Google. If you're starting a website, aim at keywords with a very low search volume and difficulty score (per whatever metric you have access to, DA, DR, TR, Moz, etc.).

Typically a volume of 30 searches per month and a difficulty of 0 should be good. Write content that gets you to page 1 of Google and gets you visits.

Once you have a certain track record, you can start aiming at higher tiers (say, between 60 and 100 searches per month).

What makes your natural tier lower than it appears to be?

When we talk about your natural tier being directly related to the volume of traffic your website receives from searches, we are talking about general searches.

However, if you have a brand and your website receives a certain amount of visits based on branded searches (for example, "puma shoe men" is a branded search), your Tier might be lower than what your traffic volume suggests, so make sure you remove those from your equation.

The same goes for "site:" searches. Those point directly to your website and don't add up to the volume that defines your tier.

Wrapping up: Your Website's Natural Volume Tier Matters!

Ranking in Google is a combination of different factors, some of which you have more control over. One of them is ranking for keywords in your website's natural tier, so you should determine that number, find keywords in that range, and make your life easier.